i freakin’ did it! :) 480!

In this blog

  • i freakin’ did it! – 480
  • humble pie
  • future plans

i freakin’ did it!

I guess there’s a story here but there also is much I’d rather not admit to.  The number of times it took me to finally pass my Part III board exam is one thing I’d rather not advertise.  I wish I could say “third times a charm!”  but … it was more like 5 times and possibly 6.

I hone in on my brother who didn’t even attempt Part III until after he graduated because he failed it on his first attempt but passed it on his second attempt.  So, if you don’t count all the attempts prior to graduation then, at least, I was able to emulate him.

Age is another matter I don’t really want to own up to so….hypothetically speaking ….it’s like I started this new adventure when I was still 41 years old and, after I get results for my Part IV exam which I’ll be taking in May of 2015 I …could be ,,,49.

Then things become a little surreal.  Have I actually spent a decade of my life in this pursuit? 20-25% …  and this is all post college.   As my brother described it before I started my attempt to become a DC, he said it was “balls to the wall” and, that may even be an understatement.

Humble Pie – sort of fits in with all this since I just finished up a week of reviews in preparation for my May 2015 exam.  Within minutes of the first day of reviews you realize you’re eating humble pie – within the first hour, you realize it’s more like a humble buffet that’s being forced down your throat.

The questions are rapid fire, like a machine gun.  Is body temperature increased or decreased with Graves disease?  Temperature?  Don’t we have a lab panel to look at?  I never thought of a simple vital sign pointing me in the direction of Graves disease, I think of exophthalmos – eyes bulging out, increased T3, 4, TSH …oh, OK, hyperthyroidism, I guess it would make sense that we’d have an increased temp but, by the time my 10-speed brain figures all that out I’m 3 questions behind and we’re talking about Thalassemia – …I just studied some anemias the other day, maybe I can feel a bit smug as opposed to stupid …not a chance.  I’m confusing Coombs (a test for Rh factor with Cooley’s Anemia which is a subset of Thalassemia.  Now I’m falling farther behind, feeling stupid, wondering if I even belong there.  It’s a trip – that much is certain.

That’s pretty much how the days go, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. save an hour for lunch.  We covered 2 years worth of radiology in a day and a half this past weekend.  At which point, I’m thinking the words ‘self torture’ and really don’t want to go back for any more.

Mock exams are Monday, the 27th of October – gotta show up for that.  These upcoming Part IV exams – one day is all radiology, the other consist of 25 different rooms filled with actors pretending to be patients with certain diseases.  We get a whole 5 minutes per room to ask questions and test accordingly after which time we move to another room and have 90 seconds to look over x-rays and lab results then need to come up with a diagnosis, differential dx, and appropriate case management & treatment.  I guess it’s not so bad but, this goes on for 3 hours straight.

The DC program is kind of like signing up for a slow death and you just need to graduate before it kills you.  And, other than the 20% or so that don’t make it to graduation after 15 semesters a few do die.  I remember one guy died from a heart attack one weekend when I was at school because, you know, 8 hours of classes along with clinic during the weekdays is never enough and the stress is very real.

The most self induced stressful times I’ve had this year have been at those reviews.  That’s when I’m reminded that we actually have three autonomic nervous systems.  Most everyone knows about the good old, fight or flight – that’s the sympathetic nervous system and is sort of like the bodies gas pedal.  Somewhat lesser known would be our parasympathetic nervous system which would be like our brakes or some say ‘wine & dine’ or even …poop & relax.  Probably the least well known autonomic nervous system would be our enteric nervous system which is made up of two subsets known as Aurebach’s and Meissner’s plexuses.  This system basically has to do with our gut.  and – without exception that’s where I feel a great deal of stress making itself known but, it also helps me make greater sense of various ailments such as enteropathic arthropathies and remembering to ask patients about various work and social aspects of their life to help gauge levels of stress in their lives.

March of this year was my first post graduation attempt at Part III and I failed it worse than any other time I attempted the exam with a very dismal score of 340.   A score of 375 is needed to pass Part III.  I did learn that we needed to have everything from Part II down cold and wholly memorized as a prerequisite for getting through Part III so I scheduled review sessions for Parts II, III and even a few PT reviews this past August.  Essentially 23 solid days of reviews in 3 different states – Iowa, Kansas and Missouri and averaged about 12 hours a day of worthwhile study.

Well – it freakin’ paid off!  A few days ago I checked to see when the scores might be available and to my surprise the website said results would be available Monday morning, 8 a.m. MST.

I crushed it!  Bested my previous score by 140 points and ended up getting a 480!

2014-10-27 14.11.43

There was a week between my last review session and that exam and that week was probably unduly stressful because I had to work every day leading up tot he exam – my fault,  for not requesting more days off but, I had already taken off nearly a month – still, I’d done enough to pass with flying colors! 🙂

In order to finally get though school, I had to break things up by first finishing all my classes then I focused exclusively on completing my clinics.  That strategy did work and got me to graduation.  However, a lot of the kids I talked with during this past week shared with me that they were in the process of finishing up their 2nd year of radiology with me – I have to go back about 3 years to when I finished and I realize, every day that passes between when all these classes ended and now all tends to make that humble buffet a little bigger every single day.

On the other hand, maybe it’s a bit like that Leitner method of memorization with spaced repetition and perhaps I can at least say I’m on my way to eventually consuming, digesting and assimilating that humble buffet.

I’ve got about 6 months before that exam.  I just need to up my game.

oh yeah – one of the last hotels I stayed at when prepping for my Part III retake didn’t have a desk, it barely had room for the bed so I spent a lot of time outside with a book and leaning on the balcony.  I spent so much time with my elbows on that balcony holding my books that I eventually wore the skin away on my elbows to the point of bleeding.  Study battle scares!  Good for the male ego and kind of funny.  About a week later my brother took a picture

2014-08-28 01.15.46 - Copy

well, not overly dramatic but, if you look closely you can still see the study scars 😉

Honestly, it was pretty emotional to see that score.  Anyway, I suppose that’s enough musing.

Time to look forward – There is one state in the country that allows you to get a license with Part III and that state is Illinois where I happen to live 🙂

and, with that license I can finally apply to test and become an NRCME! – Nationally Registered Certified Medical Examiner.

How long does it take to get a license…. (had to Google this)  looks like once I tic off 15 or so items the state requires and get everything sent in then I should have it within about 2 and a half months.  ….hmmmm, maybe by Valentines Day 🙂

Pondering 2015 – real possibilities include that license and a black belt in karate.  I think I’m signed up for 3 half marathons – 2 in April and one Rock n Roll in October.

I did play it a little smart and allocated some post-review time at my parents condo so I’ll have some time to get some plans in motion and figure out more for 2015 and, ideally not end up as sick and strung out on stress like I was after my last bout of reviews.

I did learn on that site I Googled that only 150 hours of CMEs (Continuing Medical Education) is needed each year, I thought it was 200 hours.  This will afford me some great opportunities.  I think one of the first things I’d like to go after is a diplomat (specialty) in Neurology.  A first step there will be searching out a former teacher by the name of Dr Bub!  🙂

 

 

 

 

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Flawless Perfection & Week 23/36 Weigh-In

In this blog

  • Flawless Perfection
  • Week 24/36 Weigh-In

 – Flawless Perfection – 

Usually when I first wake up in the morning there is already something preset in my mind, either a topic or concept or maybe even something I need to do.  While I was going through my 24 days of study prep for my Part III exam I had one morning theme occur twice and that was Flawless Perfection.

Flawless Perfection has to do with people – pretty much everybody.  I suppose part of me was thinking in terms of diamonds.  Ratings such as VVS refer to Very, Very Small Inclusions which is one indicator for a very high quality diamond and that’s the way most people are – very, very high quality.  I also recall a saying from a book I once read by Denis Waitley which stated, if we could buy people for what they think they are worth and sell them for what they are really worth then we would be billionaires overnight because it seems like most people don’t realize how high quality and spectacular they really are.

Although I’ve had these thoughts before about people, I think a video on YouTube may have been another catalyst to bring this thinking back to the forefront of my brain.  I think I was looking up Tic Douloureux (trigeminal neuralgia) and along the side was an associated video of some type of extreme makeover for a person with an overgrown jaw.  It seemed a bit tawdry but, I’m not immune to such things, so I clicked on it.

The biggest part of this makeover involved jaw reconstruction – the jaw was broken and parts of the jaw were removed bilaterally to eliminate the protruding underbite.  There were also a few other docs like a dermatologist and ophthalmologist then things kept getting more superficial such as makeup and clothing.

From my perspective and observation of this individual, I could easily see that they were essentially perfect as is and I don’t mean that to be glib but literally and this could pretty much be proven mathematically as well.  Just with the review books I was pouring over in the last month, we covered several hundred various inclusions or diseases and ailments a person could have but, this person in the video didn’t show signs of any of them.

I have the 23rd edition of Cecil Medicine which is 3,078 pages long and usually has multiple ailments per page so, even if this person’s protruding jaw were listed in that book that’s still a very small fraction of things that could potentially be wrong with her but, moreover – consider the ICD codes.  These codes are used in health care offices to document diagnoses.   The latest version is ICD 10 and according to a quick Googling there are 68,000 different ICD 10 codes.  Incidentally, ICD stands for International Classification of Disease. – honestly, I thought I’ve read of there being over 150,000 codes but, I could have been mistaken.

So, even if a person has 1, 2 or even 10 different ailments or diseases – given the enormous number of things that could be wrong with them, the ailments would still constitute such a small percentage that they would still be more flawlessly brilliant than even the most flawless diamond.

People in general

People in general

Anemias – 25 to 30 Trillion

For the past week or so I’ve been working to learn more about anemias, a condition which effects about 1 out of 4 people globally.  In my head, I’ve always had the approximate numbers of 4-6 million when it comes to lab results for a CBC (complete blood count) but, what finally got in my head during my studies were the units used which are given in cells/mcl – cells per microliter.  A microliter is one millionth of a liter.  We’re talking about something about the size of 1/10th of a grain of rice and, on average – between men and women, say about 5,000,000 red blood cells contained in that tiny little speck of rice.

So, in one liter of blood, we’re now talking 5 million red blood cells per microliter times 1 million (the number of microliters in a liter) and get an answer of 5 Trillion!  5,000,000,000,000 red blood cells in a liter of blood.

How many liters in the human body?  That depends a lot on the size of the individual but, an answer such as 5-6 liters should cover the bulk of the Gaussian curve and if we use the lower end of 5 liters of blood in the human body then the total number of RBC’s would be 5 times 5 trillion or 25 Trillion Red Blood Cells!  I recall reading once that the annual US budget is in the neighborhood of 4 trillion and a quick Googling stated there is about 10.5 trillion US dollars floating around worldwide.  So, the number of red blood cells in our body trumps those numbers by a quite a bit.

The numbers in the human body can get even more staggering if we consider the fact that each red blood cell holds about 250 million hemoglobin molecules – what’s 25 trillion times 250 million?  idk….

and – each molecule of hemoglobin can hold 4 oxygen molecules ….  well, I can do 25 Trillion times 4 – 100 Trillion then take that times 250 million for the total number of oxygen receptor sites on all those hemoglobin molecules.

From Guyton Textbook of Medical Physiology (11th ed, page 3):  “Although the red cells are the most abundant of any single type of cell in the body, there are about 75 trillion additional cells of other types that perform functions different from those of the red cell.  The entire body, then, contains about 100 trillion cells”

idk – try putting a puzzle together with 100 trillion pieces which is to say nothing of all the individual components that make up all these cells.

I was watching a video the other day which showed that a car engine can be taken apart and it’s pieces scattered all over but, for someone that knows what they’re doing, all those pieces can be put back together and the car can run like it did before it was taken apart.  With people – not so much.

If there is anything more spectacularly amazing than people, I have yet to discover what it is.

Week 23/36 Weigh-In

Why Week 23/36?

Well, I’ve weighed myself every week for 36 weeks and it’s been 23 weeks since my ….huh, i believe i made a mistake – it’s actually been 24 weeks worth of weigh ins since my weight loss contest ended (i should have counted Week 0 as week 1 for maintenance)

Week n - 2nd 12 Week Session Weeks 23-36 - Copy

I like those numbers better – 24/36.  12 weeks of weight loss, 24 weeks of maintaining the weight loss.

We definitely reached a new high with last weeks weigh in but, it’s still only about 3% above where this maintenance phase started 24 weeks ago.  Initially, I was considering all the extra stress inherent with that Part III exam as part of the explanation for the weight increases over the past  ….well, 6 weeks now.  However my frequency of running has greatly diminished and last week – my number of runs was zero which is quite a contrast from the 100 miles I put in during the month of August.

Primarily, I’ve been consciously wanting to avoid stress so, maybe nixing the running is one way my psyche went about helping to accomplish that objective.  I could tell my brain was in a funky place the past few weeks and figured it would get back to normal eventually.

I did replace the picture of Southern Sardinia with one of the Swiss Alps 🙂

I started this blog about 5 days ago and kept adding bullet points – about 15 of them but, that’s a lot to blog about.  There are just so many interesting things out there.

Alas, it’s time to do that work thing 🙂

Week 22 Day 2 – 1.2 Miles

My running weeks run Monday through Sunday so I still had a chance, as of yesterday, to still fit in 4 runs for this week.  Unfortunately an unexpected rain shower and my gym being closed put an end to that idea.

I did head out tonight and squeezed in a quick 1.2 miles.

2014-09-07 03.17.13

I’ll probably have a similar run tomorrow before work to give me three runs for the week then I’ll look to maintain the frequency for the final days leading up to my Part III exam.

I did 100 miles last month and in the last 8 days of the month I only ran twice so, tomorrow is the 7th day of Sept and I’ll be able to get in a third run.  I did have a 13.1 mile training run last month and a double run day for a total of 11.5 miles and one 8 mile day.  Other than those three runs there wasn’t anything much beyond a 10k.

It looks like Sports Tracker has upgraded it’s online website.  I like the new format.  It’s URL is listed as beta.sports-tracker.com  At the top of the dashboard is a chart showing my last 30 days worth of running with a total of 19 hours 44 minutes spent running and a distance of 82 miles.  Apparently, that’s down 9% from the previous 90 days.

Since it was raining last night I went grocery shopping and found an amazing deal on bottled water – only $1.99 for a 24 pack so I got 6 cases.  That should help put me back on track.

Basically, making sure to get in my runs, regardless of how short and shooting up a blog of each one will be about the extent of my running involvement for the rest of this week.  My mind is pretty well focused on that upcoming exam.

I’m pretty sure I’ll do much better than my previous attempts but don’t know for sure if I’ll pass.  If I don’t pass then I would think there would only be one or two areas out of the 9 areas we get tested on which would need more work.  I know I could maintain 7 or 8 areas and beef up whatever area might be left to pass for certain in March but, there is still a decent chance next week.  We’ll see.

Pass or fail, I still want to get through Part IV next May.  I’ll be darned – just checked the NBCE website and there’s only three major areas to be tested and one of them is actually (finally) chiropractic.

  • x-ray interpretation and diagnosis
  • chiropractic technique
  • case management

I was talking with an MD friend of mine about all these exams and he said his part four was for his specialty so, that would make sense that we finally have some actual chiropractic in this last exam.

I was looking at some Instagram running post and one person mentioned that “this shit sure takes a long time”  I would have to agree.  It certainly does with the running and I’m also thinking it sure takes a long time with the doctor road as well.

I got some literature again from St George’s University School of Medicine while I was away on my travels.  This is the medical school down in Grenada and, if anyone reading this is old enough to remember it’s a country the US invaded back in the early 80’s when Reagan was president.  From what I’ve learned that medical school in Grenada and the great many US students there played a factor in our invasion.  About all I really remember was seeing a picture of a long line of US helicopters making their way into the country and wondering how terrifying that must be if you’re someone on the ground.

It sure would be a beautiful place to stay for 4 years while getting a degree but I have no idea how the financial aspects of it would work.

That mailer prompted me to look into the situation a bit more.  Back in the 1970s there were three medical schools in the caribbean and as of 2011 there are now 60.

hmmmm – here is a picture of the beach at St George

1280px-Grand_Anse_Beach_Grenada

that’s a picture probably worth clicking on to make bigger ….it’s very alluring.

but – for now, I have to focus myself on getting this:

engraved_cert

 

I have a plaque just like that for completing the physiotherapy requirements for the NBCE.  With the plaque above I’ll be good to go for practice in any state in the Union and, a few other countries as well.

6 years post college – 1.5 years to finish up licensing – at least 1 year understudy working w/ someone else then after 5 years with my own office things should be looking pretty sweet.  At least, that’s the standard pattern I’ve seen many of my colleagues take.

 

Muscle Splinting Psychology & Foot Keystones

An Impetus to Psychological Splinting:
Muscle splinting is a phenomenon where the body will try and protect itself by causing certain muscles to become hypertonic or stiff in order to help protect underlying visceral or somatic tissue.  A couple examples that come to mind would be in the case of appendicitis or whiplash.

Considering appendicitis, when a doctor performs an abdominal exam they will palpate and percuss four quadrants of the abdominal region, in the lower right quadrant is an area known as McBurney’s point which is about 1/2 way between the umbilicus and anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) or about 2/3rds of the way down for doctors practicing in Europe.  The muscles superficial to the appendix will tighten up to help protect an inflamed appendix and this point will cause pain when palpated in a pt with appendicitis.

McBurney's Point

McBurney’s Point

A similar mechanism takes place in a whiplash patient regarding the muscles around the neck.  Again, the body is trying to protect itself.

As I wake this morning there is a bit more stress and anxiety inherent with another trip and another round of reviews for my impending Part III boards testing.  In the medical community the Part III analog is called Step 3.

Steps 1 and 2 for MDs or Parts I and II for DCs are essentially test which cover basic sciences like chemistry, physiology, anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and the like.  For chiropractors I know Part 1 consist of 9 hours of testing spread out over a two day period of time and part II is a bit longer and also spread out over two days.  Part III is only a 4 hour exam with half given in the first two hours, then a 20 minute break then another 2 hours of testing to finish up.  Part III is more clinical in nature and among other things covers all the basic exams, such as the aforementioned abdominal exam.

I’m not exactly sure why but some things stick very well the first time I hear them while other things take considerable focus and effort to get in my brain.  One thing that stuck when first learning the abdominal exam is a condition known as Caput Medusa.  I guess it has a catchy name that’s hard to forget.  Caput Medusa (CM) is a distention of veins around the umbilicus and although it can be caused by increased pressure in the inferior vena cava the liver is usually what I think of first regarding CM and portal hypertension.

Patient with Caput Madusa

Patient with Caput Madusa

My writing has gone a little tangential but my original thinking was engaged in finding insight into a possible phenomenon I’ll refer to as psychological splinting.  The brain is a visceral organ but instead of thinking in terms of a physical insult or any type of trauma we may also consider psychological insult or trauma and ways we, as humans may and up splinting ourselves psychologically in order to help protect ourselves.

As mentioned earlier, I am currently in a position which allows me an opportunity to use myself as a kind of living laboratory in order to examine my own responses to increases in stress and anxiety.  In order for my brain to help figure out a scientific type allegory I was lead to the concept of muscle splinting and have just started to ponder and consider implications associated with such thinking.

However, I am pressed for time so I’ll have to allocate portions of my four and a half hour trip to Kansas for further evaluation and pondering of psychological splinting.

 

Foot Keystones
There are three arches in the foot; a lateral and medial arch as well as a transverse arch.

Three Arches of the Foot

Three Arches of the Foot

In each of these arches, one bone in each arch acts as a keystone to each arch, the place where maximal stress and load takes place.

In the medial arch the navicular bone is the keystone.  In the lateral arch it’s the cuboid and the transverse arch most commonly has the 2nd metatarsal as the keystone.  An interesting part about this is that those bones, particularly the navicular and cuboid bones are bones that we, as chiropractors, have specifically learned to adjust.

The second metatarsal bone is most common in people with normal biomechanics however that load might also be found on the third or sometimes even as far over as the 4th metatarsal depending on the particular individual.

Morton Neuroma is found along the transverse arch, usually between the 2nd and 4th metatarsal and most commonly between the third and fourth metatarsal.  It is a perineural fibrosis (a thickening of tissue around one of your nerves) and causes nerve degeneration of the common digital nerve.  This usually results in a burning pain (which is common for nerve injuries) and often refers to the dorsal or top surface of the foot.

High heeled shoes have been linked to the development of Morton’s neuroma.  However, it should be noted that when referring to something like high-heeled shoes we come back to a basic situation of altered biomechanics.

One type of psychological splinting discovered for myself. 
Today, it looks like I’ve managed to put off final packing for my trip by writing in this blog so, avoidance may be considered one type of psychological splinting (PS) that I employ in my own life.  Beyond that, however, I’ve taken note of the method employed for my own method of PS which would have to do with reaching out to others and communications.  I would consider avoidance to be a general manifestation of PS while the mode employed i.e., communicating, to be a subset of that general mode.

That insight comes about as a result of recalling that, in the past, when I would be driving to school and have a particularly imposing and intimidating test looming that I would often text my girlfriend at the time and that communication frequency was much higher than normal communications under less stressful circumstances.

As a further offshot and tangent, I know have to wonder if the artificial manufacturing of stressful situations in a coupled relationship is done so that increased communications does take place and as such may be somehow perceived as a benefit to the one who might instigate say, an argument when no perceivably real genesis for an argument or altercation exist to begin with.

 

Reference: for those interested in some of the neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) aspects of Muscle Splinting:  The role of autogenic inhibition in the reduction of muscle splinting by Herbert Miller, PhD

5th Annual St Louis Pride 5k! Ba-Boom! :)

 2014-06-29 16.22.08



Sunday Morning, June 29th….


1:30 a.m. – finally get off work
2:00 a.m. – small 3 egg meal
2:30 a.m. – finally get to bed…

5:57 a.m. – I finally wake to alarm clocks which have been going off since 5 a.m.  Could I really make it in time?  I was disoriented.  I knew packet pickup was from 5:30 to 6:30 then I realized the race didn’t start until 7 a.m.  …I had 1 hour and 3 minutes to dress, get to St Louis and pick up my packet!
6:03 a.m. – I’m dressed and in my car, pulling out to head to St Louis!
6:51 a.m. – I’ve already made it to St Louis, parked, got my race packet, returned it to the car, affixed my bib # and awaiting the St Louis Pride 5k!

 2014-06-29 06.42.162014-06-29 06.51.16

7:14:01 a.m. – the 7 a.m. race finally starts and I cross the chip timing mat
7:52:37 a.m. – I cross the chip timing mat for a chip time of 0:38:36!  My time according to Sports Tracker is 0:38:31

 2014-06-29 20.49.51

By 11 a.m. I was back home and starting on this blog but was unable to keep my eyes open any longer and had to take a nap!
3:42 p.m. – back awake and hoping to finish out this blog before I have to leave for my 5 p.m. work shift

On June 15, 2014 – 0:42:27 was my finish time for the Go! 5k
On June 29, 2014 – 0:38:36 was my finish time for the Pride 5k

 2014-06-29 09.50.31

My weapons of choice were my Brand New New Balance Fantom Fit 1080s and they felt GREAT!  I also ran my first mile in the second fastest time of the year at 11:31 (fastest was yesterday at the Macklind Mile at 10:52)

I was able to take off nearly 4 MINUTES to set a new PR (personal record) for my best ever 2014 5k time 🙂  My Sports Tracker stopwatch showed an improvement of 4 min 5 seconds.  The official chip timings for both race show an improvement of 3 min 51 seconds.  Either way it was a really nice improvement – AND, had I finished about 9 minutes sooner I would have come in third place!  (I would have also had to have been in the 60-69 year old age bracket) but – that’s as close as I’ve ever come to a respectable finish 😉  🙂

IMG_20140629_080120

 ~SWAG~
The SWAG was pretty cool and I still have to go through it all but the tech t-shirt is pretty cool and the colorful medal was fun 🙂  I got a couple other things from ProRehab of St Louis when I received a post race stretching.  The two girls working the booth went to SLU and also worked as Ball Girls at the St Louis Cardinals games, those are the ones that dance around on top the dugouts and use giant slingshots with FredBird to shoot out balled up t-shirts to the crowd.  The really interesting thing was that one of the girls was from Jonesboro, Arkansas and was familiar with Wynne, Arkansas – the place where I’ll be running my 3rd full marathon!  🙂  So, I got some useful information from her as well as some good post race stretching.

2014-06-29 09.42.03

4:41 p.m. – gotta post this and get to work!
5:00 -11:00 p.m. – work!
somewhere between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. sleep and clean an office!  🙂

This was a fun run and I would do it again!  🙂  🙂  🙂

2014-06-29 23.41.442014-06-29 16.22.08

 

 

W8D3 – Be Willing To Risk Failure Everyday

Image

Be willing to risk failure everyday.  

Be willing to risk failure everyday unless you are OK with being average or mediocre.  

Failures lay along the path to success.  

Only those with the courage and fortitude to risk failure can ever hope to traverse a path of significance.

Week 6, Day 2 – KABLAM! :)

A previous best non-stop run of 7 minutes 30 seconds was shattered today with a non-stop run of 16 minutes and 8 seconds!  YeeHaw!  🙂  My text message shout out today included the following quote from Dante.

TPsCR4GQGjYsd7-KTc3vrwKP32OLS6pDHuv-7hLahQE
Naturally, it’s not raining a drop outside right now but there was a steady rain all morning.  It wasn’t too bad, just a constant drizzle so, I finally made the trek out and finally ended up at the park to get in my training run.  It’s funny, this morning, faced with the task I had on my plate …I really didn’t want to do any of the things on my list.  Some days can be like that, I suppose.

I think the new songs I downloaded and put no my phone helped.  It helped as a distraction from the running and, as long as the music was playing, I could not year any of my labored breathing.

Divergence!  
Divergence!Divergence!
I thought the first picture I was going to take and post would be of the path from the 0.9 to the 1.0 mile marker which is a nice straight away and goes on for nearly another tenth of a mile before turning but, I was much more excited about this road which is adjacent to the park.  The building on the left is used by the city and the very nice park is to the right.  Actually, to the right of this road is a nice lake with a fountain in the middle of it.  The lake is flanked by mile markers 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 then a nice gentle incline to 0.6 🙂  There are many Canada geese which inhabit the park as well as many, many turtles.

Breaking off the path!  The first time I ran for an hour non-stop is when I broke off from this path at Long Acre Park and ventured into nearby neighborhoods.  That was 20 years ago and I’ve never forgotten about it.  I even remember the neighborhood where I ran 🙂

Generally speaking and especially for now while I’m building up a base and conditioning, I’ll go to this same park, over and over and over again.  There are a couple things I keep in mind with this pursuit.  One is something I read a long time ago and one thing is something I read just last week which is

“Manhood is Patience, Mastery is Nine Times Patience.”

and, from a long time ago, I recall, ” ’tis the good reader that makes the good book”

The quote about the good reader making the good book has to do with the person reading the book and what thoughts, experiences and memories that person is able to bring to the book.  This might be the same path over and over again but, it is patience and persistence.  I also can learn new things each time I go, both about myself and the park.  Today I learned that while the path from 0.5 to 0.6 is on an incline in one direction, the road that runs parallel to it has it’s incline in the opposite direction.  I also found a new plaque last week that I never noticed before.  Mainly though, there’s a lot of learning to do about oneself.

I think the biggest thing I did which probably helped this run out the most was to take yesterday off from working and there were no lawns cut prior to this run either.  I did read a little bit after the run but, it wasn’t from a radiology book.  I’ll have to get on that.  Right now that upcoming exam in September can easily seem to fall into the Steven Covey category of important but not urgent.  I need to make it more urgent and start getting some real work done.  I suppose Pre’s quote can apply to school, learning and education just as well as it does to running.  😉

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